Conclusion: The Significance of Parenthood

These are excerpts from the CONCLUSION of my research on the significance of the biblical commandment to honor parents (Exodus 20.12 and Deuteronomy 5.16).

Vorsicht! This is legally copyrighted!

Note: The Decalogue is the Ten Commandments. Deka is Greek for ten, and logos is the Greek for word.

“The doing away of the traditional institution that is represented by the network of related families that value the role of parenthood in such a drastic manner that was exhibited since the first Industrial Revolution threatens the very fabric of human existence. It was also during that time when an explosion of child labor and exploitation occurred. Perhaps the key word in that statement is ‘drastic.’ The question is, had such changes been distributed in little increments throughout a longer period of time, then would humanity have come up with measures to prevent modernization’s morbid effects? Most likely humanity first has to gather an eon’s amount of wisdom before it can settle into an unruffled placid existence. Parenthood represented constancy and continuity. In the classical paradigm, parents are not only the vehicle for the perpetuation of the human species but they were also the source of knowledge and guiding wisdom for the conduct of daily life. They were conduits for the transference of collective memory on to the consequent generations. As such, they were indispensable to any generation. If humanity can’t get it from a long string of generations of parenthood, then it has to locate its source from somewhere else that is just as honorable.”

“The modern Latin Church in its various denominations does not lack in its teachings regarding the respect due to parents. It has also accommodated within its teachings various ways of how to cope with modernity’s family-related problems. However, since there is no single institution that equals in authority at how humans were once guided by the ethos of the family — that is, institutions like the Church, the academe, and other such similar agents of ‘learning’ are all sources of ‘truth’ and are none the only source of ‘truth’ — then it becomes obvious that such institutions must form direct and constant communication among each other for the sole sake of the consequent generations’ well-being. The survival of a healthy humanity, with the full capacity for creativity and choice that was endowed by God, is at stake and there must be better answers than the ones that we have now. Where for a long time in human history the community of persons took care of everyone, perhaps now it has to be a similar ‘community’ of institutions.”

“The injunction to honor parents side by side with the effect of having ‘long life’ has something to do with a family’s cohesiveness not only in the emotional aspect of daily life but, more importantly, in the perceived capacity and responsibility for its ability to take care of the members’ needs. Where the family is perceived as a unit and where the elders are integral parts of the community, the injunction to honor parents becomes as moral and as ethical as not murdering and not stealing, the two most obviously universal items in the Decalogue. At the time when this primary function of the family and its immediate community was taken away from it — that is, the elders being the perennial moral teachers to the consequent generations within the context of the community’s way of life, and the family members being guided and assured of belongingness in all aspects of their existence — there was no turning back from the familial and personal problems that have become manifest in modern society, regardless of its level of material or cultural prosperity and sophistication. At such contexts where problems are situated within the emotional or psychological realms, not only is the honoring of parents in danger of being rendered irrelevant but the rest of the Decalogue as well. Whatever universal precepts that can be discerned within the Decalogue, like not lying and not coveting, are under threat of becoming worthless phrases in the end.”

 

9 thoughts on “Conclusion: The Significance of Parenthood”

  1. Dear Mona Lisa P. Siacor,

    I have had the pleasure of browsing a number of your posts and pages on your content-rich blog, a significant part of which has been dedicated to your biblical, historical and systematic investigation of “the significance of the biblical commandment to honor parents (Exodus 20.12 and Deuteronomy 5.16)” as a requirement for the completion of your doctoral dissertation in Protestant Theology at University of Regensburg in 2017.

    Given your professional interest and theological background, particularly regarding honouring parents, I am certainly very keen and curious to know what you make of my special multimedia eulogy-cum-memoir-cum-biography entitled “Khai & Khim: For Always and Beyond Goodbye” published at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/2019/08/31/khai-khim-for-always-and-beyond-goodbye/

    The said post is best viewed in situ (not via WordPress Reader) on a desktop or laptop computer with a large screen, given that my posts and pages are often accompanied by intricate graphical designs, videos and even animations. Looking forward to reading your esteemed feedback following your perusal of my post there.

    Happy mid-August to you!

    Yours sincerely,
    SoundEagle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Mr. Khai, I am sorry for posting this late and responding late also. I had to take a break from online activities these past few days due to an urgent matter. I thank you very much for the many many Likes you have left in my blog. You are very gracious and generous. I see that you have responded to my Comment in your Post. Thank you in advance, and (I almost forgot to say it again) thank you for this invite. —Mona Lisa—

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Dear Mona Lisa P. Siacor,

    I would like to inform you that I have submitted a comment here on August 16, 2021 at 6:19 pm. The comment still awaits your approval.

    I am delighted by your positive feedback and shall reply to you at the comment section of my said post entitled “Khai & Khim: For Always and Beyond Goodbye” with a bespoke response as soon as I can.

    Meanwhile, there could be other writings of mine that you might be interested in reading, such as the one entitled “Easter in Modern Multimedia Perspective“, available at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/2015/04/11/easter-in-modern-multimedia-perspective/

    Yours sincerely,
    SoundEagle

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Dear Mona Lisa,

        Thank you for your reply. You are welcome to address me as SoundEagle, as hardly anyone has ever address me as Mr Khai.

        May you thoroughly enjoy and even be surprised by what you will discover on visiting the said post about Easter!

        Yours sincerely,
        SoundEagle

        Like

      2. Dear Mona Lisa,

        For your convenience, you can choose to change one of your WordPress settings so that you only need to manually approve the very first comment of a commenter, and subsequent comments are automatically approved.

        Yours sincerely,
        SoundEagle

        Like

      3. Dear Mona Lisa,

        Great! Let’s give it a try now. Here’s my comment for you to test your new setting.

        By the way, I am going to publish a very special new post in about half an hour. It will be full of animations plus a ten-stanza poem. May you enjoy it soon!

        Yours sincerely,
        SoundEagle

        Liked by 1 person

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