Contents of a Dissertation on Parents

Greetings.

Depending on a student’s background and preparation, making a doctoral dissertation can be a piece of pie or a gargantuan task. Fortunately for me, my professor-adviser-counselor, my Doktorvater, generously guided and supported me althroughout my writing years.

In my case, I wanted to look for a way to talk about the biblical commandment on parents/elders which would not look intimidating to the non-specialist (i.e., on biblical studies).

This list of contents was what I was able to do. The main parts follow, and the complete list with the subparts are below.

  • Preliminaries
  • Introduction
  • Part 1. The Biblical Period: From the Old Testament to the New Testament (please see a note regarding Part 1’s title HERE)
  • Part 2.  The Period of the New Testament Formation (how this Part was put together is talked about HERE)
  • Part 3. The Church Fathers: How They Treated the Commandment to Honor Parents
  • Part 4. The Middle Ages: The Family Against Its Social Background and How the Elders of Society Were Treated
  • Part 5. The Reformation and Early Modern Era
  • Part 6. Industrial Revolution and Modernity
  • Part 7. Summary, Synthesis and Conclusion
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY (This bibliography has more than 400 entries, less than 4% of which are online sources.)

[You may also download a PDF copy of it all here, or you may access the scanned Table of Contents from the university library in Regensburg—just look for the access-link on the catalog page, which looks like this, the icon indicated by the arrow:

Citation, for my dissertation:

Siacor, Mona Lisa. The Significance of the Elterngebot: A Biblical, Historical, and Systematic Investigation. Iloilo City, Philippines: Central Philippine University Press, 2017.

Notes on a couple of terms I used:

The Elterngebot is the biblical commandment on parents, to honor them, in Exodus 20:12 and Deuteronomy 5:16.

The Decalogue is the Ten Commandments (from deka, Greek for ten, and logos, which means word).

TABLE  OF  CONTENTS

Preliminaries

 A. Existing Works on the Decalogue’s Commandment to Honor Parents

 B. The Objective of This Investigation

Introduction

Part 1. The Biblical Period: From the Old Testament to the New Testament (please see a note regarding Part 1’s title HERE)

 1.1.1 The Israelites

 1.1.2 The Family in Ancient Israel

 1.1.3 The Land

Chapter 1.2 Introduction and History of the Decalogue

 1.2.1 The Number of Statements in the Decalogue

   1.2.1.1 The Numbering of the Ten Commandments

 1.2.2 Authorship of the Decalogue

 1.2.3 Earliest Form of the Decalogue

 1.2.4 Agreement Between God and Israel

 1.2.5 The Place of the Decalogue Among the Old Testament Laws

Chapter 1.3 Significant Scholarship on the Origin of the Decalogue

 1.3.1 Mowinckel: Cult

 1.3.2 Alt: Festivals

 1.3.3 Mendenhall: Treaty

 1.3.4 Gerstenberger: Clan/Family

 1.3.5 Rowley: Kenite Origin

Chapter 1.4 Conclusion

Chapter 1.5 The Division of the Decalogue Between the Two Tablets and the Significance of the Placement of the Elterngebot Within This Division

Chapter 1.6 Similar Statements to the Elterngebot in the Old Testament

 1.6.1 Among the Law Codes and the Other ‘decalogues’

   1.6.1.1 Deuteronomy 27:15-26

   1.6.1.2 Exodus 34: 14-26 [Ritual Decalogue]

   1.6.1.3 Leviticus 18–20

   1.6.1.4 Exodus 21:15, 17 and Deuteronomy 21:18-21

 1.6.2 The Elterngebot in Wisdom Literature

   1.6.2.1 In Ecclesiastes and Job

   1.6.2.2 In Proverbs

   1.6.2.3 In Psalms

 1.6.3 Conclusion

Part 2.  The Period of the New Testament Formation

Chapter 2.1 Social Background

Chapter 2.2 The Greco-Roman Influence

Chapter 2.3 The Family in the Greco-Roman World

Chapter 2.4 The Beginnings of Classical Judaism

Chapter 2.5 The Elterngebot in the Deuterocanonicals

Chapter 2.6 Early Rabbinic Literature and the Elterngebot

Chapter 2.7 Honoring Parents in the New Testament

 2.7.1 The “Family” of Jesus

Chapter 2.8 The Gospels and Epistles

 2.8.1 Investigating Three Important Themes in the Gospels Related to the Elterngebot

   2.8.1.1 The Prevailing Prominence of the Elterngebot

   2.8.1.2 The Elterngebot Taken as a Point in an Argument with the Prevailing Religious Authorities

   2.8.1.3 The Elterngebot as Part of Jesus’ Teachings

 2.8.2 In Colossians and Ephesians

   2.8.2.1 Introduction

   2.8.2.2 The Household Codes in Colossians and Ephesians

   2.8.2.3 (Die) Haustafel in Colossians

   2.8.2.4 (Die) Haustafel in Ephesians

   2.8.2.5 A Consolidated Overview

Chapter 2.9 Conclusion

Part 3. The Church Fathers: How They Treated the Commandment to Honor Parents

Chapter 3.1 Introduction to the Church Fathers

Chapter 3.2 The Elterngebot During the Period of the Church Fathers: A General Overview

Chapter 3.3 The Elterngebot During the Period of the Apostolic and Ante-Nicene Fathers

 3.3.1 Clement of Alexandria

 3.3.2 Tertullian

 3.3.3 Cyprian of Carthage

 3.3.4 Constitutions of the Holy Apostles

 3.3.5 Pseudo-Matthew

 3.3.6 Origen

 3.3.7 Gregory Thaumaturgus

 3.3.8 Conclusion

Chapter 3.4 Post-Nicene Trends

 3.4.1 Augustine

 3.4.2 John Chrysostom

 3.4.3 Conclusion

Part 4. The Middle Ages: The Family Against Its Social Background and How the Elders of Society Were Treated

Chapter 4.1 Introduction

Chapter 4.2 Early Medieval Period (From the “Fall” of Rome Until Before 1000 AD)

 4.2.1 Societal Background and the Family

 4.2.2 Religiosity and the Church

Chapter 4.3 High Medieval Period: Around 1000–1300 AD

 4.3.1 Thomas Aquinas

Chapter 4.4 Conclusion

Part 5. The Reformation and Early Modern Era

Chapter 5.1 Background and Societal Upheavals

Chapter 5.2 Early Modernity and Protestantism

 5.2.1 Luther’s Large Catechism

 5.2.2 The Elterngebot in Contemporaneous Literature

   5.2.2.1 Calvin’s Institutes

   5.2.2.2 The Catechism of the Council of Trent (1566 AD)

Chapter 5.3 Summary

Part 6. Industrial Revolution and Modernity

Chapter 6.1 Characteristics of this Period and How Families Were Affected

Chapter 6.2 Problems Plaguing the Modern Family

Chapter 6.3 Current Views on the Commandment to Honor Parents

 6.3.1 Catechisms Used Today

   6.3.1.1 Lutheran: Protestant Catechism for Adults

   6.3.1.2 Roman Catholic Catechisms

     6.3.1.2.1 Catechism of the Catholic Church

     6.3.1.2.2 Pope Francis’ Exhortation

     6.3.1.2.3 United States Catholic Catechism for Adults

   6.3.1.3 Anglican: To Be A Christian—An Anglican Catechism (2014)

   6.3.1.4 Reformed: The Book of Confessions

     6.3.1.4.1 The Shorter Catechism

     6.3.1.4.2 The Larger Catechism

 6.3.2 Contemporary Views of the Elterngebot by Selected Scholars

   6.3.2.1 Werner Elert

   6.3.2.2 Peter Brunner

   6.3.2.3 Konrad Lorenz and Wolfgang Wickler

   6.3.2.4 Thorwald Lorenzen

Chapter 6.4 Conclusion

Part 7. Summary, Synthesis and Conclusion

BIBLIOGRAPHY

That’s it. Thank you for dropping by!

Other [important] information, which is also in the PDF copy of the contents, above:

The copyright page shows the following:
This work was accepted as a dissertation in 2017 by the
Fakultät für Philosophie, Kunst–, Geschichts– und Gesellschaftswissenschaften,
Universität Regensburg, Bayern, Deutschland (under the Institut für Evangelische Theologie).
[Institute of Protestant Theology — Faculty of Philosophy, Art–, History– and Social Sciences (Humanities) of the University of Regensburg, Bavaria, Germany.]


(D 355) ISBN 978-621-95560-2-6


Philippine Copyright © 2017 by Mona Lisa P. Siacor.
All rights reserved.

[Scripture quotations are generally from:]
New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989,
National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.
Used by permission. All rights reserved.


Published and printed 2017
by the Central Philippine University Press,
Iloilo City, Philippines.

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